DevOps East 2017 Concurrent Session : Hands-On Machine Learning Using the R Language

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Wednesday, November 8, 2017 - 2:45pm to 3:45pm

Hands-On Machine Learning Using the R Language

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After you hear Stephen Frein's keynote on intelligent software, join him for a hands-on tour of machine learning techniques. Using the free R language and the RStudio IDE, Stephen guides you through a sampling of machine learning techniques and discusses how these techniques can be used for both understanding and prediction. Follow along as he extracts data from online sources and builds machine learning models in real time to predict numeric values, assign classifications, and categorize textual sources of information. Experiment with the demonstrated methods by modifying the code and data sets he supplies. Learn how to interpret and improve your results. Gain a deeper understanding of technologies that are changing the world before our eyes, and come away with the ability to explore further on your own.

Note: You are encouraged to bring a laptop equipped with R and RStudio, and before the session to download code and data that will be available on Stephen's website (www.frein.com).

Stephen Frein
Comcast

Stephen Frein is a senior director of software engineering at Comcast. He previously managed high profile software projects for the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Treasury. For two decades, he has been leading development and testing teams to questionable success by dint of accidents he cannot reliably replicate. As an adjunct professor at Drexel and Villanova, Stephen delivers soporific lectures on machine learning, database development, and technology management to frequently inattentive students. He has presented at previous TechWell events by sneaking into unused rooms and deceiving the unsuspecting. Stephen enjoys polluting the hive mind via TechBeacon and other industry publications with questionable editorial standards. Visit his poorly maintained vanity website, where he practices writing vapid, self-congratulatory bios.